former Soviet satellites

Tajikistan 1

Tajikistan

The national flag of Tajikistan was adopted in November 1992, replacing the flag of the Tajik Soviet Socialist Republic of 1953. The flag of Tajikistan is a horizontal tricolor of red, white and green with a width ratio of 2:3:2, charged with a crown surmounted by an arc of seven stars at the center. The tricolor preserves the choice of colors in the former Tajik Soviet flag, as well as the 1:2 proportions.

Montenegro 2

Montenegro

The flag of Montenegro is red, with the coat of arms in the middle, and golden borders. The ratio of the flag is 1:2. The coat of arms takes up ​2⁄3 of the flag’s height. The middle point of the coat of arms matches the middle point of the flag. The width of the border is ​1⁄20 of the flag’s proportions. Two versions of the Montenegrin flag are in use, horizontal, mostly used outdoor; and vertical, mostly used indoor.

Latvia 3

Latvia

Though officially adopted in 1923, the Latvian flag was in use as early as the 13th century. The red colour is sometimes described as symbolizing the readiness of the Latvians to give the blood from their hearts for freedom and their willingness to defend their liberty. An alternative interpretation, according to one legend, is that a Latvian leader was wounded in battle, and the edges of the white sheet in which he was wrapped were stained by his blood. The white stripe may stand for the sheet that wrapped him.

Hungary 4

Hungary

The flag of Hungary is a horizontal tricolor of red, white and green. In this exact form, it has been the official flag of Hungary since 23 May 1957. The flag’s form originates from national republican movements of the 18th and 19th centuries, while its colors are from the Middle Ages. The current Hungarian tricolor flag is the same as the republican movement flag of the United Kingdom (used since 1816) and the colors in that form were already used at least since the coronation of Leopold II in 1790, predating the first use of the Italian Tricolor in 1797.

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