Saba 2

Saba

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In 1963 Saba residents built the Juancho E. Yrausquin Airport. This 400-metre (1,300 ft) landing strip is reputed to be the shortest commercial runway in the world, and is restricted. Only trained pilots flying small STOL airliners, such as the Twin Otter and the Britten-Norman Islander may land there, as well as helicopters. The airport offers flights to and from the nearby islands of St. Maarten and Sint Eustatius.

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Juancho E. Yrausquin Airport

There is also a ferry service from St. Maarten; the ferry boats “Dawn II ~ The Saba Ferry” and “The Edge” both travel to Saba three times a week. In addition, there are anchorages for private boats.

Of note are 800 steps carved from stone that reach from Ladder Bay to the settlement known as The Bottom. Until the late 20th century, everything that was brought to the island in boats and ships was carried up by hand using these steps. The steps are now often used by tourists who wish to experience an intense climb.

Flag of Saba:

The flag of Saba was adopted on December 6, 1985 (national day of the island). 130 different designs were presented to the Commission. The chosen flag was designed by an 18-year-old Saban named Edmond Daniel Johnson.

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Flag of Saba

Saba accepted Dutch sovereignty after 1816 and used the Dutch flag. However, since some islanders considered Saba a “republic”, they added a special symbol – a green cabbage — to emphasize their independence, and this symbol was used probably until about the 1920s.

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