North America

Nicaragua 1

Nicaragua

The two Azure bands on the flag and the arms of Nicaragua in use today are the most similar to those used by the United Provinces of Central America. The triangle, volcanoes, rising sun, Cap of Liberty, and rainbow all appeared on the original emblem. The coat of arms used today contains the name of the state, Republica de Nicaragua, whereas in 1823 the title was Provincias Unidas del Centro de America. The decision to revert to the emblems used by the United Provinces of Central America was taken in 1908 and reflected Nicaragua’s aspirations for the rebirth of the political entity formed by the 5 nations. Except for the text around the arms, the flag is very similar to that of the United Provinces of Central America. The 5 volcanoes represent the original 5 member states, the Cap of Liberty represents national freedom, and the rays of the sun and the rainbow are symbolic of the bright future to come.

Sint Maarten 2

Sint Maarten

The flag of Sint Maarten is the national flag of Sint Maarten. The flag, designed by 17 year old Roselle Richardson, was officially adopted on 13 June 1985.

The design features a horizontal bi-colour of red and blue with the coat of arms of Sint Maarten on a white chevron, thus incorporating the colors of the Dutch flag. The red symbolizes solidarity and courage, the blue peace and assurance of pardon, and the white purity and faith.

Saba 4

Saba

The flag of Saba was adopted on December 6, 1985 (national day of the island). 130 different designs were presented to the Commission. The chosen flag was designed by an 18-year-old Saban named Edmond Daniel Johnson.

Saba accepted Dutch sovereignty after 1816 and used the Dutch flag. However, since some islanders considered Saba a “republic”, they added a special symbol – a green cabbage — to emphasize their independence, and this symbol was used probably until about the 1920s.

Curaçao 5

Curaçao

The national flag of Curaçao represents the country of Curaçao as well as the island area within the Netherlands Antilles from 1984 until its dissolution in 2010. The flag was flown for Curaçao and Dependencies for which the flag of the Netherlands was never used.

The flag is a blue field with a horizontal yellow stripe slightly below the midline and two white, five-pointed stars in the canton. The blue symbolises the sea and sky (the bottom and top blue sections, respectively), divided by a yellow stroke representing the bright sun which bathes the island. The two stars represent Curaçao and Klein Curaçao, with the five points on each star symbolise the five continents from which Curaçao’s people descend.

Bonaire 6

Bonaire

The flag of Bonaire has a large dark blue triangle in the lower right corner and a smaller yellow triangle in the upper left corner. It was adopted on 11 December 1981.

The triangles are separated by a white strip, inside of which is a black compass and a red six-pointed star. The dark blue and yellow triangles represent the sea and sun respectively while the dividing white strip represents the sky. The colors red, white, and blue also show Bonaire’s loyalty to the Kingdom of the Netherlands. The black compass represents the population of Bonaire who comes from the four corners of the world.

The red six-pointed star represents the original six villages of Bonaire – Antriol, Nikiboko, Nort Saliña, Playa, Rincon and Tera Korá.

Aruba 7

Aruba

Aruba’s national flag was adopted on March 18, 1976. The design consists of a field of light blue (called “Larkspur”), two narrow parallel horizontal yellow (“Bunting Yellow”) stripes in the bottom half, and a four-pointed white-fimbriated red (“Union Flag red”) star in the canton. The flag was designed in part by vexillologist Whitney Smith.

The four colors and symbols each have significance:

Light Blue signifies the sea that’s surrounding the island of Aruba.

Mexico 8

Mexico

Red, white, and green are the colors of the national army in Mexico. The central emblem is the Mexican coat of arms, based on the Aztec symbol for Tenochtitlan (now Mexico City), the center of the Aztec empire. It recalls the legend of an eagle sitting on a cactus while devouring a serpent that signaled to the Aztecs where to found their city, Tenochtitlan. A ribbon in the national colors is at the bottom of the coat of arms. Throughout history, the flag has changed several times, as the design of the coat of arms and the length-width ratios of the flag have been modified. However, the coat of arms has had the same features throughout: an eagle, holding a serpent in its talon, is perched on top of a prickly pear cactus; the cactus is situated on a rock that rises above a lake.

Jamaica 9

Jamaica

The flag of Jamaica was adopted on 6 August 1962 (Jamaican Independence Day), the country having gained independence from the British-protected Federation of the West Indies. The flag consists of a gold saltire, which divides the flag into four sections: two of them green (top and bottom) and two black (hoist and fly). It is currently the only national flag that does not contain the colors red, white, or blue.

Honduras 10

Honduras

The national flag of Honduras was adopted on March 7, 1866, based on the flag of the Federal Republic of Central America. In 1823 Honduras joined the United Provinces of Central America and adopted their flag. In 1866 it was amended; five cerulean stars were placed in the center to represent the five original Central American provinces. The colors and pattern are the same as the flag of the United Provinces of Central America.

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